Susan Jacob Clay: Ashland as a Place of Joy and Sorrow

YOU ARE HERE -> 1843-1866 Susan (Susannah) Maria Jacob Clay is one of the most important figures in Ashland’s history.  As Henry Clay’s daughter-in-law, she had lived with and was very close to Clay, and after his death served as family historian and Ashland’s mistress.  Ashland became a place of both great joys and great … More Susan Jacob Clay: Ashland as a Place of Joy and Sorrow

Civil War at Ashland’s Door

YOU ARE HERE -> 1861-1865 Henry Clay’s great-granddaughter, Elizabeth Clay Blanford (1904-1999), in a 1987 interview, revealed some evocative information about the Civil War at Ashland.  Her father Charles (1857-1935), the first of James and Susan’s children to be born in the rebuilt Ashland mansion, had shared with his children his memories of that frightening … More Civil War at Ashland’s Door

With Civil War Looming, James and Susan Clay Open Ashland to the Public

YOU ARE HERE -> 1857-1865 Once the second Ashland mansion was complete in 1857, normal hospitality resumed.  Henry Clay’s son James and his wife Susan were, for at least the first years of their tenure, quite open to the public’s visitation, “extending cordial courtesies to almost unnumbered visitors.” The public was especially curious about the … More With Civil War Looming, James and Susan Clay Open Ashland to the Public

An American History Museum …in Henry Clay’s House

YOU ARE HERE -> up to 1852 Ashland’s history is unique in the world of historic house museums in that there was a very early and unusual practice of displaying artifacts for a public audience …within Ashland, while it was still a private dwelling.  Henry Clay himself initiated a particular manner of presenting the past … More An American History Museum …in Henry Clay’s House