An American History Museum …in Henry Clay’s House

YOU ARE HERE -> c1820-1852 Ashland’s history is unique in the world of historic house museums in that there was an early and uncommon practice of displaying artifacts for a public audience …inside the Ashland mansion, while it was still a private dwelling.  Henry Clay himself initiated a particular manner of presenting the past in … More An American History Museum …in Henry Clay’s House

Farmer Henry Clay, the Progressive Sage of Ashland Part II: Livestock

YOU ARE HERE -> up to 1852 Henry Clay took his farm seriously.  Farming got in his blood during his youth in the Slashes of Virginia, where he grew up on a large farm.  At Ashland, Clay was as interested in financial gain as he was in improving farming and breeding techniques.  He was scientific … More Farmer Henry Clay, the Progressive Sage of Ashland Part II: Livestock

Farmer Henry Clay, the Progressive Sage of Ashland – Part One

YOU ARE HERE -> c1812 to 1852 Part One:  An Introduction by James F. Hopkins, excerpted from The Journal of Southern History, February 1949 Henry Clay, Farmer and Stockman During the years in which Henry Clay was active in politics, he was at the same time a farmer who never lost his love for the … More Farmer Henry Clay, the Progressive Sage of Ashland – Part One

The Fate of Ashland After Clay’s Death: Son James Makes a Difficult Decision

YOU ARE HERE -> 1850s In the final months before Henry Clay died in June of 1852, his son James B. Clay promised his father that he would assume the responsibility for Ashland, as Clay had desired.  James and his family planned to occupy the historic estate, but there was a serious problem: Henry Clay’s … More The Fate of Ashland After Clay’s Death: Son James Makes a Difficult Decision

We Were Soon Perfectly At Home, As Everyone Must Be With Mr. Clay

YOU ARE HERE -> c1820s-1852 Henry Clay rose in an era when appearing to be a “commoner” was advantageous for one’s political image.  Andrew Jackson, the “common man,” benefited from this perception.  Henry Clay himself was known as the “Great Commoner,” but for Clay this was no act; in his words and behaviors, he personified … More We Were Soon Perfectly At Home, As Everyone Must Be With Mr. Clay

Henry Clay’s House

YOU ARE HERE -> 1805-1815 Early in 1805 Henry Clay contracted with Lexington builder John Fisher for the construction of a mansion at Clay’s Ashland property.  Architectural historians Patrick Snadon and Michael Fazio in The Domestic Architecture of Benjamin Henry Latrobe theorize that Latrobe may well have designed this initial structure for Clay. When the two-story Federal … More Henry Clay’s House

The Fate of Ashland After Clay’s Death: Son James Makes a Difficult Decision

YOU ARE HERE -> 1850s In the final months before Henry Clay died in June of 1852, his son James B. Clay promised his father that he would assume the responsibility for Ashland, as Clay had desired.  James and his family planned to occupy the historic estate, but there was a serious problem: Henry Clay’s … More The Fate of Ashland After Clay’s Death: Son James Makes a Difficult Decision