The Story of the 1846 Cottage At Ashland

It is the picturesque little building that you first encounter: The Keeper’s – or Gardener’s – Cottage.  Adjacent to today’s modern parking lot, this Henry Clay-era original structure is a charmer. The Cottage was designed in 1846 by Thomas Lewinski, the Lexington architect who had helped Clay with some mansion remodeling, had designed homes for … More The Story of the 1846 Cottage At Ashland

Clay Family Loses Ashland, University of Kentucky Predecessor Moves In

YOU ARE HERE -> 1860s Although Ashland had survived its first transfer of ownership – from Henry Clay’s widow Lucretia to their son James, remaining in family hands – after the Civil War it would not. Due to the death of James in 1864, the financial hardship after the war, and complex dealings with settling … More Clay Family Loses Ashland, University of Kentucky Predecessor Moves In

Farmer Henry Clay, the Progressive Sage of Ashland Part II: Livestock

YOU ARE HERE -> up to 1852 Henry Clay took his farm seriously.  Farming got in his blood during his youth in the Slashes of Virginia, where he grew up on a large farm.  At Ashland, Clay was as interested in financial gain as he was in improving farming and breeding techniques.  He was scientific … More Farmer Henry Clay, the Progressive Sage of Ashland Part II: Livestock

Historical Authenticity of Ashland’s Grounds and Formal Garden

YOU ARE HERE -> 1950s-today From the time Ashland opened as a museum in 1950 the grounds and outbuildings surrounding the mansion have been just as essential to visitor experience as touring the house. Ashland featured seventeen acres open daily to the public.  Although the mansion remained the primary focus, from the beginning the Henry … More Historical Authenticity of Ashland’s Grounds and Formal Garden

The Fate of Ashland After Clay’s Death: Son James Makes a Difficult Decision

YOU ARE HERE -> 1850s In the final months before Henry Clay died in June of 1852, his son James B. Clay promised his father that he would assume the responsibility for Ashland, as Clay had desired.  James and his family planned to occupy the historic estate, but there was a serious problem: Henry Clay’s … More The Fate of Ashland After Clay’s Death: Son James Makes a Difficult Decision

Interpreting Henry Clay in a Charming Home Environment

YOU ARE HERE -> 1950s-1970s Unlike many historic house museums, the public display of Ashland’s collection began during the domestic life of the founder’s—Henry Clay’s—home some 150 years before.  The coexistence of home and museum actually has a long history at Ashland; exhibiting and interpreting artifacts for the public has been occurring for almost two … More Interpreting Henry Clay in a Charming Home Environment

Giving the Impression that Henry Clay “may return at any moment”

YOU ARE HERE -> 1880s-1940s When Henry Clay’s son James and his wife Susan left Ashland during the Civil War, they placed their precious Clay heirlooms safely in family hands.  Their family line would retain a large portion of Henry Clay artifacts, many of which eventually found their way back to Ashland after 1950.  But … More Giving the Impression that Henry Clay “may return at any moment”

The Origins of Kentucky University and The Kentucky A&M …and How They Came to Ashland

Founder and Regent of Kentucky University, John Bryan Bowman (1824-1891) held a lofty vision for higher education in Kentucky and was devoted to the ideal of egalitarian education, proclaiming, “I want to build up a People’s Institution, a great university eventually accessible to the poorest boy in all the land…”[1] Bowman was a man of … More The Origins of Kentucky University and The Kentucky A&M …and How They Came to Ashland

We Were Soon Perfectly At Home, As Everyone Must Be With Mr. Clay

YOU ARE HERE -> c1820s-1852 Henry Clay rose in an era when appearing to be a “commoner” was advantageous for one’s political image.  Andrew Jackson, the “common man,” benefited from this perception.  Henry Clay himself was known as the “Great Commoner,” but for Clay this was no act; in his words and behaviors, he personified … More We Were Soon Perfectly At Home, As Everyone Must Be With Mr. Clay