The Origins of Kentucky University and The Kentucky A&M …and How They Came to Ashland

Founder and Regent of Kentucky University, John Bryan Bowman (1824-1891) held a lofty vision for higher education in Kentucky and was devoted to the ideal of egalitarian education, proclaiming, “I want to build up a People’s Institution, a great university eventually accessible to the poorest boy in all the land…”[1] Bowman was a man of … More The Origins of Kentucky University and The Kentucky A&M …and How They Came to Ashland

The Origins of Kentucky University and The Kentucky A&M …and How They Came to Ashland

Founder and Regent of Kentucky University, John Bryan Bowman (1824-1891) held a lofty vision for higher education in Kentucky and was devoted to the ideal of egalitarian education, proclaiming, “I want to build up a People’s Institution, a great university eventually accessible to the poorest boy in all the land…”[1] Bowman was a man of … More The Origins of Kentucky University and The Kentucky A&M …and How They Came to Ashland

A Treasured Artifact: Clay’s Ghent Jacket

YOU ARE HERE -> 1814-today A fragile and precious artifact periodically makes its appearance at Ashland today: Henry Clay’s ceremonial jacket that he wore at the signing of the Treaty of Ghent.  Clay had been part of the American delegation sent to Belgium to negotiate a peace treaty with the British in 1814, which effectively … More A Treasured Artifact: Clay’s Ghent Jacket

Historic Homestead as College Campus

YOU ARE HERE ->1866-1879 After the Civil War, Kentucky University took ownership of Ashland.   (SEE ALSO: Clay Family Loses Ashland, University of Kentucky Predecessor Moves In.) Regent John B. Bowman believed that Kentucky University was to be permanently located at Ashland, so he made plans for the buildings and grounds to prepare them for University … More Historic Homestead as College Campus

Clay Family Loses Ashland, University of Kentucky Predecessor Moves In

YOU ARE HERE -> 1860s Although Ashland had survived its first transfer of ownership (from Henry Clay’s widow Lucretia to his son James), remaining in family hands, after the Civil War it would not.  Due to James’s death in 1864, the financial hardship after the war, and complex dealings with settling the Ashland estate, James’s … More Clay Family Loses Ashland, University of Kentucky Predecessor Moves In